Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hi everyone. I'm Brandon and welcome back to HindiPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, season 1, Lesson 2: A Family Visit in India.
Ayesha: Namaste, I'm Ayesha.
Brandon: In this lesson you’ll learn the different continuous tenses and their usage. This conversation takes place inside a home.
Ayesha: The speakers are Archana and her Aunt, who she refers to as Maamii, which means “mother’s brother’s wife.”
Brandon: Since they're family members, they'll be using familiar Hindi. Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Aunt: नमस्ते बेटा, कैसी हो तुम? अाने में कोई तकलीफ़ तो नहीं हुई?
Archana: नहीं मामी, मैं बिलकुल अाराम से अाई हुँ।
Aunt: अंदर अाकर बैठ लो। मैं अभी चाय बना रही हुँ।
Archana: हाँ शुक्रिया मामी, मैं पहले ज़रा हाथ-मुह धो लु?
Aunt: दो मिनट बैठ जाअो। तुम्हारा भाई अभी अंदर नहा रहा है।
Archana: अच्छा कोई बात नहीं। अभी बहुत दिनों के बाद मिलुंगी उस से। मामा नज़र नहीं अा रहे?
Aunt: हाँ वह अभी बाज़ार से कचोरियाँ लाने गए हैं। तुम जल्दी पहुँच गयी न। बस अभी अा जाएंगे।
Archana: हाँ अाज अाते हुए रस्ता बिलकुल खाली मिला। तभी वक्त इतना कम लगा।
Brandon: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Aunt: नमस्ते बेटा, कैसी हो तुम? अाने में कोई तकलीफ़ तो नहीं हुई?
Archana: नहीं मामी, मैं बिलकुल अाराम से अाई हुँ।
Aunt: अंदर अाकर बैठ लो। मैं अभी चाय बना रही हुँ।
Archana: हाँ शुक्रिया मामी, मैं पहले ज़रा हाथ-मुह धो लु?
Aunt: दो मिनट बैठ जाअो। तुम्हारा भाई अभी अंदर नहा रहा है।
Archana: अच्छा कोई बात नहीं। अभी बहुत दिनों के बाद मिलुंगी उस से। मामा नज़र नहीं अा रहे?
Aunt: हाँ वह अभी बाज़ार से कचोरियाँ लाने गए हैं। तुम जल्दी पहुँच गयी न। बस अभी अा जाएंगे।
Archana: हाँ अाज अाते हुए रस्ता बिलकुल खाली मिला। तभी वक्त इतना कम लगा।
Brandon: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
A: नमस्ते बेटा, कैसी हो तुम? अाने में कोई तकलीफ़ तो नहीं हुई?
Brandon: Hello, how are you? I hope you didn't have any trouble coming here?
B: नहीं मामी, मैं बिलकुल अाराम से अाई हुँ।
Brandon: No Auntie, I came very comfortably.
A: अंदर अाकर बैठ लो। मैं अभी चाय बना रही हुँ।
Brandon: Come inside and sit. I'm making some tea right now.
B: हाँ शुक्रिया मामी, मैं पहले ज़रा हाथ-मुह धो लु?
Brandon: Yes, thank you, Auntie. Can I wash up quickly first?
A: दो मिनट बैठ जाअो। तुम्हारा भाई अभी अंदर नहा रहा है।
Brandon: Have a seat for a couple of minutes. Your brother is showering in there right now.
B: अच्छा कोई बात नहीं। अभी बहुत दिनों के बाद मिलुंगी उस से। मामा नज़र नहीं अा रहे?
Brandon: Oh, okay, no problem. I'll be seeing him after quite some time. I don't see Uncle around?
A: हाँ वह अभी बाज़ार से कचोरियाँ लाने गए हैं। तुम जल्दी पहुँच गयी न। बस अभी अा जाएंगे।
Brandon: Yes he's just gone to the market to get kachoris. You arrived earlier than we expected, right? But he'll be back soon.
B: हाँ अाज अाते हुए रस्ता बिलकुल खाली मिला। तभी वक्त इतना कम लगा।
Brandon: Yes, I found the roads quite empty on the way here. That's why it took less time than expected.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ayesha: In the conversation, we heard about snacks called kachoriyaan.
Brandon: Ayesha, can you tell us about those?
Ayesha: Sure. They’re small stuffed dishes that are made of deep-fried batter on the outside, similar to samosa, and have savory fillings.
Brandon: The stuffing is made with different vegetables mashed with spices, and the batter is slightly crispy.
Ayesha: They’re delicious!
Brandon: What other tea-time snacks do you have?
Ayesha: There are also pakora, samosa, and various sweets. Many different items from around the country are very good with the evening tea or chai.
Brandon: Well chai is actually enjoyed throughout the day, but there is also a tradition of evening “tea-time” meals.
Ayesha: That’s when people sit down to chat over cups of tea and different snacks.
Brandon: Okay, now on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is...
Ayesha: तकलीफ़ [natural native speed]
Brandon: difficulty
Ayesha: तकलीफ़ [slowly - broken down by syllable] तकलीफ़ [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have...
Ayesha: मामा/मामी [natural native speed]
Brandon: maternal uncle, maternal aunt
Ayesha: मामा/मामी [slowly - broken down by syllable] मामा/मामी [natural native speed]
Brandon: The next one is...
Ayesha: अंदर [natural native speed]
Brandon: inside, indoors
Ayesha: अंदर [slowly - broken down by syllable] अंदर [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Ayesha: बैठना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to sit
Ayesha: बैठना [slowly - broken down by syllable] बैठना [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have...
Ayesha: हाथ-मुह धोना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to freshen up (to wash your hands and face)
Ayesha: हाथ-मुह धोना [slowly - broken down by syllable] हाथ-मुह धोना [natural native speed]
Brandon: The next one is...
Ayesha: नज़र [natural native speed]
Brandon: sight, view
Ayesha: नज़र [slowly - broken down by syllable] नज़र [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Ayesha: बाज़ार [natural native speed]
Brandon: market
Ayesha: बाज़ार [slowly - broken down by syllable] बाज़ार [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have...
Ayesha: कचोरियाँ [natural native speed]
Brandon: fried stuffed Indian snacks
Ayesha: कचोरियाँ [slowly - broken down by syllable] कचोरियाँ [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Ayesha: लाना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to bring
Ayesha: लाना [slowly - broken down by syllable] लाना [natural native speed]
Brandon: And last we have...
Ayesha: खाली [natural native speed]
Brandon: empty
Ayesha: खाली [slowly - broken down by syllable] खाली [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ayesha: First up is the phrase ‘हाथ-मुह धोना (haaTH-muh DHoNaa).
Brandon: While this literally means “to wash your hands and your face,” it can be translated as something like the phrase “to freshen up.”
Ayesha: haaTH-muh DHoNaa is used as a phrase to describe what people might do when they come home after working, or when they reach a resting place after traveling.
Brandon: Okay, what’s the next word?
Ayesha: The next word is नज़र (Nazar) which literally means “eyesight.” This word has some different uses.
Brandon: One meaning is simply “sight” or “view.”
Ayesha: In this sense, the sight or view belongs to a person, such as “my sight” or “my view,” which is मेरी नज़र (merii nazar) or “his sight or view” which is उसकी नज़र (uSkii nazar).
Brandon: The second meaning is “attention.”
Ayesha: For example, शो के दौरान मेरी नज़र सिर्फ तुम पर थी| so ke DauraaN merii Nazar Sirf Tum par THii) means “For the length of the show, I was only watching you.” Here we have मेरी नज़र सिर्फ तुम पर थी| (merii Nazar Sirf Tum par THii).
Brandon : This literally means “my attention was entirely on you,” or “you had my attention” or “I only noticed you.”
Ayesha: Similarly, नज़र रखना (nazar rakhNaa) means “to keep an eye on,” which is the same as “to watch over.” There's an extension of this meaning, which is a bit different. This is the idea of the “evil eye,” which is बूरी नज़र (buurii Nazar) in Hindi.
Brandon: The idea is that looking at someone or something with bad intentions and wishing them harm is unlucky. The phrase...
Ayesha: नज़र लगना (Nazar LagNaa)
Brandon: ...comes from this idea, and means “to be cursed by evil eye.” There are many rituals associated with this, and people believe that if something is too perfect, people will cast their sights on it.
Ayesha: In the Hindi-language region in India, it's very common to see trucks, buses, and vehicles marked with the sign बुरी नज़र वाले तेरा मुह काला (burii Nazar vaaLe Teraa muh kaaLaa) which means, “You with the evil-eye, may your face be blackened.”
Brandon: This is done to ward off the evil eye. Okay now on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson you’ll learn about the continuous tenses in Hindi: the past continuous, the present continuous, and the future continuous.
Ayesha: For all of these tenses, you use an extra verb, which is rahNaa. On its own, rahNaa means “to stay,” but it's used with other verbs to form the continuous tense “was doing,” “is doing,” and “will be doing.”
Brandon: The tense of this verb stays constant in all the tenses. Only the masculine, feminine, and singular or plural forms can change. In the masculine singular, it's...
Ayesha: rahaa.
Brandon: The feminine is...
Ayesha: rahii.
Brandon: And the plural or polite neutral form is...
Ayesha: rahe.
Brandon: What about the past continuous, Ayesha?
Ayesha: The past continuous uses rahaa, rahii, or rahe with Thaa, THii, or THe, which creates the tense “was doing” in the first person and third person. In the second person, it will only be rahe THe.
Brandon: Can you give us some other examples?
Ayesha: Sure. Let’s use the verb karNaa, which means “to do.” This verb comes first and is followed by rahaa, rahii, or rahe. So “I was doing,” when spoken by a female, is main kar rahii THii in the first person.
Brandon: What’s the third person plural and second person singular?
Ayesha: The third person plural is vo kar rahe The, which means, “They were doing.” The second person singular is Tum kar rahe THe, and the plural is aap kar rahe THe. This is in the familiar level. The other option is the casual level, which follows the first and third persons with Tu kar rahaa THaa or Tu kar rahii THii.
Brandon: Alright, that's the past continuous. Let’s talk about the present continuous now.
Ayesha: The only change here is in the sentence endings. In the first person, the singular is huun and the plural is hain.
Brandon: Ok, so how can we say, “I'm doing,” in Hindi?
Ayesha: You can say, “I’m doing,” in Hindi by saying main kar rahaa OR rahii huun. “We're doing” is ham kar rahe hain.
Brandon: And this is in all levels of politeness.
Ayesha: In the second person, the singular is ho, and the plural is hain in the higher levels of politeness.
Brandon: The casual level is the same as the third person, which is...
Ayesha: Tum kar rahe ho or aap kar rahe ho when it’s one person, and when it’s many people it's aap kar rahe hain.
Brandon: The gender doesn’t need to be expressed here, right?
Ayesha: Exactly. In the third person, and also the second person casual, the endings are hai in the singular, combined with rahaa or rahii, and in the polite level it's rahe. In the plural third person, it's rahe hain.
Brandon: So “he's doing” in Hindi is...
Ayesha: Vah kar rahaa hai.
Brandon: And “she's doing” is…
Ayesha: Vah kar rahii hai.
Brandon: In the polite level, it’s...
Ayesha: Vah kar rahe hai.
Brandon: The plural “they're doing” is just...
Ayesha: Vo kar rahe hain.
Brandon: Okay, now let’s take a look at the future continuous.
Ayesha: The Hindi sentence ending for “will be” is either hogaa, hogii, or hoNge.
Brandon: These are the masculine singular, feminine, and plural forms or in the polite neutral level. The first person and third person are the same in the future continuous.
Ayesha: The singular masculine ending is rahaa hogaa; the feminine is rahii hogii; and the plural is rahe hoNge, which is also the singular polite level for all genders.
Brandon: What about the second person?
Ayesha: The second person uses rahe hoge for the singular and rahe hoNge for the plural. Check the lesson notes for more examples on this.
Brandon: So in Hindi,“They will be doing” is...
Ayesha: Vo kar rahe Honge.
Brandon: “You will be doing” is...
Ayesha: Tum kar rahe hoge OR aap kar rahe hoNge.
Brandon: One important note—with the future continuous tense in Hindi, you can say “I will be doing” just by saying “I will do.” Listeners, There are many differences in the tenses and genders in this lesson, so make sure you check out the lesson notes for individual examples by category.

Outro

Brandon: Well, that's all for our lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone. Until next time, bye!
Ayesha: Sukriyaa aur aLviDaa!

7 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

HindiPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! What do you usually bring to a family reunion?

HindiPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:37 PM
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Hi Arpine,


Thanks for your post!


Very good sentence, just a few corrections:


हमारे परिवार की दावत के लिए मैं कुछ स्वादिष्ट खाना या डेज़र्ट (or मीठा) पकाती हूँ।


All the best!

Roohi

Team HindiPod101.com

Arpine Galfayan
Sunday at 10:42 PM
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हमारी परिवार की दावत के लिए मैं कुछ स्वादिष्ट खाना या डिसर्ट पकती हूँ.

HindiPod101.com
Wednesday at 07:44 PM
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Hi Ian,


Thanks for your sentence in Hindi.


Just a few minor suggestions to make it better:


मैं परिवार की सभा के लिए चॉकलेट का डिब्बा ले जाता हूँ।


Also, we generally don't say "Sabhaa", we will generally say, "DaavaT" (feast) or just the English "reunion". If you have any questions, feel free to post here.


All the best!

Roohi

Team HindiPod101.com

Ian
Wednesday at 07:01 AM
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मैं एक परिवार की सभा के लिए चॉकलेट का डिब्बा लाता हूँ।

I take a box of chocolates to a family gathering.

HindiPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 11:16 AM
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Hello Anthony,


Good job!


Cheers,

Neha

Team HindiPod101.com

Anthony
Sunday at 12:01 PM
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परिवार के पुनर्मिलन के लिये मैं अक्सर शराब की एक बोटन या बियर लाता हूँ।

For a family reunion I often bring a bottle of alcohol or beer.


मेरे परिवार में जो लोग हैं उनको शराब पीना पसंद है।

In my family there are people who like to drink alcohol.