Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello, I'm Brandon and welcome back to HindiPod101.com. This is Upper Beginner, season 1, Lesson 9: Getting Ready for an Indian Wedding.
Ayesha: Namaste, I'm Ayesha.
Brandon: In this lesson you’ll learn about constructing verb conjugations to say “to get something done.” This conversation takes place over the phone.
Ayesha: The speakers are cousins called Payal and Rachna.
Brandon: Payal is younger so she'll be using familiar Hindi, and Rachna is older so she'll respond to Payal in casual Hindi. Okay. Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Payal: हेलो रचना दीदी? मैं पायल बोल रही हूँ।
Rachna: हाँ पायल, कैसी हो? कब अा रही हो?
Payal: बस अगले हफ्ते पहुँच जाउंगी। तुम बताअो तैयारी कैसी चल रही है।
Rachna: अरे पूछो मत! हम सब पागल हो रहे हैं। कितना काम पड़ा है!
Payal: चिंता मत करो, ज़रूर सही तरीके से सब हो जाएगा। मैं तो जाने तक के दिन गिन रही हूँ।
Rachna: हाँ वैसे मज़ा भी अा रहा है। अाज साड़ियाँ देखने जाएंगे और मेहेंदी लगवाएंगे। तुम होती तो मज़े करते।
Payal: हाँ मैं भी कहाँ काम में फंस गयी। कोइ बात नहीं, पहुँचने पर क्या धूमधाम से करवाएंगे तुम्हारी शादी।
Rachna: अच्छा अब जल्दी से अा जाअो बस।
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Payal: हेलो रचना दीदी? मैं पायल बोल रही हूँ।
Rachna: हाँ पायल, कैसी हो? कब अा रही हो?
Payal: बस अगले हफ्ते पहुँच जाउंगी। तुम बताअो तैयारी कैसी चल रही है।
Rachna: अरे पूछो मत! हम सब पागल हो रहे हैं। कितना काम पड़ा है!
Payal: चिंता मत करो, ज़रूर सही तरीके से सब हो जाएगा। मैं तो जाने तक के दिन गिन रही हूँ।
Rachna: हाँ वैसे मज़ा भी अा रहा है। अाज साड़ियाँ देखने जाएंगे और मेहेंदी लगवाएंगे। तुम होती तो मज़े करते।
Payal: हाँ मैं भी कहाँ काम में फंस गयी। कोइ बात नहीं, पहुँचने पर क्या धूमधाम से करवाएंगे तुम्हारी शादी।
Rachna: अच्छा अब जल्दी से अा जाअो बस।
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Payal: हेलो रचना दीदी? मैं पायल बोल रही हूँ।
Brandon: Hello, Rachna? It's Payal speaking.
Rachna: हाँ पायल, कैसी हो? कब अा रही हो?
Brandon: Yes, Payal, how are you? When are you coming?
Payal: बस अगले हफ्ते पहुँच जाउंगी। तुम बताअो तैयारी कैसी चल रही है।
Brandon: I'll be there by next week. Tell me about your preparations!
Rachna: अरे पूछो मत! हम सब पागल हो रहे हैं। कितना काम पड़ा है!
Brandon: Oh, don't ask! We're all losing our minds here; there’s so much to do!
Payal: चिंता मत करो, ज़रूर सही तरीके से सब हो जाएगा। मैं तो जाने तक के दिन गिन रही हूँ।
Brandon: Don't worry, I'm sure it will all get sorted out in time. I'm counting down the days until I reach there.
Rachna: हाँ वैसे मज़ा भी अा रहा है। अाज साड़ियाँ देखने जाएंगे और मेहेंदी लगवाएंगे। तुम होती तो मज़े करते।
Brandon: Yes, well it’s fun too. We'll be going to check out saris today and get henna designs drawn. We'd have so much fun if you were here.
Payal: हाँ मैं भी कहाँ काम में फंस गयी। कोइ बात नहीं, पहुँचने पर क्या धूमधाम से करवाएंगे तुम्हारी शादी।
Brandon: I can't believe I'm still stuck at work here! Nevermind, when I do reach there, we'll get you married in style with much fanfare.
Rachna: अच्छा अब जल्दी से अा जाअो बस।
Brandon: Yes, just get here as quickly as you can.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: Let’s talk about Indian weddings!
Ayesha: What a great topic! When you go to an Indian wedding ceremony, you’ll see there's a lot of friendly rivalry involved. The bride’s side and the groom’s side often try to play pranks and outwit each other in friendly games.
Ayesha: The bride’s side usually hosts the first ceremonies and the actual wedding, while the groom’s side hosts the ceremonies after the wedding, ending with a reception.
Brandon: Weddings are mostly celebrated in massive colorful tents outside in open areas, with lighting and decorations all around. In northern Indian communities, the groom arrives on a decorated horse with a large entourage of people who dance their way to the bride’s place.
Ayesha: The groom arrives with a band playing the whole way. This groom’s travel party is called a baaraaT in Hindi. Very often, people will jump in to dance with the baaraaT as it makes its way across town, since it’s so joyous.
Brandon: Yes, and though some communities are more ostentatious in their weddings and some are very restrained, there's always music, singing, and some dancing at these ceremonies.
Ayesha: We hope you get a chance to go to an Indian wedding one day, listeners!
Brandon: Definitely! Okay, now on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is...
Ayesha: पूछना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to ask, to ask for
Ayesha: पूछना [slowly - broken down by syllable] पूछना [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have...
Ayesha: पागल [natural native speed]
Brandon: mad, crazy
Ayesha: पागल [slowly - broken down by syllable] पागल [natural native speed]
Brandon: The next one is...
Ayesha: पड़ना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to be left over
Ayesha: पड़ना [slowly - broken down by syllable] पड़ना [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Ayesha: चिंता करना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to worry
Ayesha: चिंता करना [slowly - broken down by syllable] चिंता करना [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have...
Ayesha: मेहेंदी [natural native speed]
Brandon: henna paste
Ayesha: मेहेंदी [slowly - broken down by syllable] मेहेंदी [natural native speed]
Brandon: The next one is...
Ayesha: तरीका [natural native speed]
Brandon: way, manner
Ayesha: तरीका [slowly - broken down by syllable] तरीका [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next we have...
Ayesha: गिनना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to count
Ayesha: गिनना [slowly - broken down by syllable] गिनना [natural native speed]
Brandon: Next...
Ayesha: साड़ियाँ [natural native speed]
Brandon: sari, an Indian women’s garment that’s a six-meter-long cloth wrapped around
Ayesha: साड़ियाँ [slowly - broken down by syllable] साड़ियाँ [natural native speed]
Brandon: The next word is...
Ayesha: फंसना [natural native speed]
Brandon: to get trapped, to get caught
Ayesha: फंसना [slowly - broken down by syllable] फंसना [natural native speed]
Brandon: And last we have...
Ayesha: धूमधाम [natural native speed]
Brandon: fanfare, pomp, magnificence
Ayesha: धूमधाम [slowly - broken down by syllable] धूमधाम [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ayesha: The first word is paagaL.
Brandon: This is an interesting word. It very simply means “mad” or "crazy," but the term is not as strong-sounding in Hindi as it is in English. In fact, it’s often used affectionately.
Ayesha: That’s right. Even if you're expressing disagreement with someone, you might laugh and call them paagaL. It's like shaking your head at them without aggressively disagreeing.
Brandon: Yes, and among close relations it’s used to show affection. Sometimes people use it to describe someone unique and individualistic, and it’s not a criticism, because it’s not considered a negative word in Hindi.
Ayesha: Of course, this is reserved for close relations. You wouldn’t call someone paagaL in an affectionate way if you have a formal relationship with them. But you might call yourself paagaL to mean “naive” or “idealistic.” There's also the phrase khusii Se paagaL hoNaa, which means “to go mad with joy.”
Brandon: And this phrase describes ecstatic behavior. Okay, what’s the next word?
Ayesha: The next word is phanSNaa. This verb means “to get caught” or “to get trapped.”
Brandon: You can use this when you’re physically getting caught or trapped and wound up. Or it can be used in a metaphoric sense, when you’re stuck in a situation that you can’t get out of for some time.
Ayesha: It's often used to talk about long traffic jams. If you're stuck in one for hours, you could say main traifik jaim mein phanS gayaa huun OR phanS gayii huun.
Brandon: Thats “I am stuck in a traffic jam.” Okay, now on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use causative verbs in Hindi. These are verbs in the form of “to get something done.” Causative verbs can be derived from transitive verbs in Hindi.
Ayesha: Just like the transitive - intransitive verb pairs that can be derived from each, the causative verb goes one layer further from transitive verbs. This kind of verb is unique to Hindi.
Brandon: The causative verb is in the form “to get something done,” so that the object in the sentence is the one causing the action to be done by someone else.
Ayesha: Right. We know that hoNaa, meaning “to happen,” and karNaa meaning “to do,” are a transitive - intransitive pair. The transitive verb in this pair, karNaa, becomes causative in the form of karvaaNaa, which means “to get something done,” and the implication is “by another person."
Brandon: Let’s take a look at some sample sentences.
Ayesha: Okay. iSe thiik karo is an imperative sentence that means “Fix this.” This uses the transitive verb. You can compare this to iSe thiik karvaao...
Brandon: ..which is also an imperative sentence, but means “Get this fixed.” This uses the causative verb. Let’s take a look at how to form the causative verb.
Ayesha: The construction is quite simple. You can create the causative verb just by adding a vaa sound after the verb root of the transitive verb. So, looking at our previous example, karNaa changes to karvaaNaa.
Brandon: If there's a vowel at the end of the verb root, then the vowel is substituted with vaa. Ayesha, can you give us an example?
Ayesha: Sure! DikhaaNaa means “to show,” and this changes to DikhvaaNaa, meaning “to get something shown.”
Brandon: Let’s try this with a few verbs.
Ayesha: baNaaNaa means “to make.” The verb root is baNaa. Since this has a vowel, we’ll replace it with vaa, so we have baNvaaNaa. And in the same way, pakaaNaa, which means “to cook,” will change to pakVaaNaa.
Brandon: Okay, now we can try to use these in sentences. Since there are multiple actors, we use particles to clarify who does what. So how would we say, “I get my house cleaned by a cleaner?”
Ayesha: “To clean” is Saaf karNaa—a verb construction in Hindi. So the causative form will simply be Saaf karvaaNaa. And since the object is “I,” the conjugation will be singular feminine.
Brandon: So the Hindi sentence will be...
Ayesha: main apNaa ghar Saaf karvaaTii huun.
Brandon: Meaning, “I get my house cleaned.”
Ayesha: To add “by a cleaner,” you use the particle Se, which means “by” in this case.
Brandon: Hindi doesn’t have a simple word meaning “cleaner.”
Ayesha: But generally for someone who does housework, we say NaukraaNii or baaii. These are women who do house chores for pay. So we say main apNaa ghar baaii Se Saaf karvaaTii huun.
Brandon: Now listeners, it’s important to note that although we made the causative verbs quite easily with the rule, there are a few different exceptions.
Ayesha: Yes, there are. Listeners, please make sure to check out the lesson notes to learn about these exceptions.

Outro

Brandon: Well, that's all for our lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Ayesha: Sukriyaa aur aLviDaa!

5 Comments

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HindiPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Do you enjoy going to wedding parties? 

HindiPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:19 PM
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Hello Ian,


दोनों सही जवाब! बस एक चीज़ बताना चाहूंगी: DoNon Sahii javaab! baS ek ciiz baTaaNaa caahuNgii:

(Both correct answers! I'd like to make one point):

Even though "जानना jaaNNaa" and "पता होना paTaa hoNaa" are basically synonymous, when using "जानना jaaNNaa" it should usually be about some information that one can know. So in a situation where you want to say "I can't decide" or "I'm not sure", it's odd in Hindi to say "मैं नहीं जानता main Nahiin jaaNTaa" (I don't know). Since presumably you 'know' wedding parties - what they are or how they are, to answer the question about enjoying them with "मैं नहीं जानता" is unnatural in Hindi. This is a nuanced difference, but for that reason your first sentence is more fitting.


Best,

Udita

Team HindiPod101.com

Ian
Wednesday at 07:45 AM
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मुझे नहीं पता: यह पार्टी पर निर्भर करता है । और आपको ?

मैं नहीं जानता: यह पार्टी पर निर्भर करता है। और आप?

I don’t know: it depends on the party. What about you?

HindiPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:06 PM
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Hi Anthony,


Thank you for all your comments :smile:

We are glad to see that you are practicing often.


Sincerely,

Laura

Team HindiPod101.com

Anthony
Saturday at 08:07 AM
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हाँ, मुझे शादी की पार्टी जाना पसंद है।

Yes, I enjoy going to wedding parties.


नोवम्बर में मैं अपनी माँ के साथ एक शादी जाऊँगा।

In November, I will be going to a wedding with my mother.


शायद मैं इस शादी के लिये हिंदुस्तानी कपड़े खरीदूँगा।

Perhaps for this wedding I will buy Indian clothes.


या शायद मैं कपड़े दर्जी से बनवाऊँगा, किसको पता है....।

Or perhaps I will get them made by a tailor, who knows....